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Digital Health, Internet Of Things IoT, Wearables
The Kaiser Family Foundation provided a table of Population Distribution by Age in the United States showing that in 2016 there was a total of 88,681,600 people age 55 and over. Of those, 47,456,500 fell into the “senior citizen” bracket and were 65 years old and over. The projected number of senior citizens by 2020 will be 56 million. keep reading
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Big Data, Internet Of Things IoT
2016 was a year for significant technological breakthroughs that transformed the way we live, work, and play. Virtual reality was finally within our grasp. People and devices were connected to each other and our environments more than ever. And automation changed the way we worked. So what do we expect in the new year? Here are our top tech trends for 2017 that we’re keeping our eyes on: IoT in the workplace In 2016, technology like Nest allowed us to change the environment in our homes through smart devices we could control remotely. It is expected that 2017 that these IoT devices will go beyond the home and into the workplace in the form of sensors, software, and other technology that is interconnected. This will guarantee that the workplace environment is running efficiently while also cutting on costs through intelligent devices that will automatically “sleep” when not in use. These smart devices will “speak” to one another ensuring optimal efficiency while keeping track of not just office equipment but also its workforce through location services. The rise of chatbots As LiveWorld chairman and CEO Peter Friedman predicts, “In 2017, brands will strategically and seamlessly integrate humans into chatbot interactions to scale and advance the effectiveness of their chatbot programs.” Mike Roberts, head of Messenger at Kik said, “It’s more of a cultural shift. Users are now so used to chatting with their friends via SMS and messengers that they feel comfortable with that same interface delivering an app experience.” “Bots make people’s lives easier, but are not designed to replace people,” said Roberts. “If you’re at a baseball stadium in your seat and want food, you’d have to either leave your seat or yell at one of the vendors if they’re near your section by chance. If the stadium had a bot, you could just chat with that bot inside the Kik app to request what you’d like and pay for it as well without ever having to risk leaving your seat — the vendor sees that you’ve ordered and paid for your food, at which point he or she will deliver.” Enhanced security for IoT With the rise of IoT in the workplace, the need for heightened security measures to protect Internet of Things devices has become a concern. Cisco head of strategy, Macario Namie, recently told TechRepublic, “As IoT continues to expand beyond businesses and into the realm of smart cities and connected government programs, the requirement for watertight security will continue to rise. 2017 will be the year where we see policy makers and governments step in to mandate IoT security guidelines across industries. In fact, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security just issued its Strategic Principles for Securing the Internet of Things (IoT) document in November.” Virtual and augmented reality 2017 will be a big year for virtual and augmented reality. With big-name hardware already hitting the market last year, expect an increase in momentum. With the current hardware still being connected by wires, look forward to the transition to Bluetooth technology and the introduction to wireless VR tech. Merchants are not far from introducing a full shopping experience via virtual reality with the ability to shop for everything from clothes to cars, and real estate. And Apple will finally make an Augmented Reality SDK accessible to developers which is likely to be just an introduction to more powerful iOS AR apps to be released later in the year.
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Digital Health, Wearables
2016 saw us have fruitful collaborations between One Nucleus and Swedish collaborators on topics such as Digital Health, innovation in pharmaceutical science, the future of the Swedish and Danish Life Sciences and biomanufacturing. The collaboration continues with Sweden Showcase and BioWednesday London, as One Nucleus showcase nine leading companies and initiatives from Sweden in order to highlight potential business opportunities to the One Nucleus network. The showcasing will be followed by a UK-Sweden discussion on current investment trends and future of wearables in healthcare. There is an apparent shift in emphasis from investors, away from consumer wellness applications to clinically driven solutions that drive better health outcomes at lower cost. The panel at this event will discuss if this trend is indicative that there are greater opportunities for value creation for those wishing to develop solutions that help clinicians, patients and payers than for those focussing on wellness applications alone.
Programme 15.30 – Registration 16.00 – Welcome from One Nucleus and Host Tony Jones, One Nucleus Niall McAlister, Olswang 16.10 – Update on Life Sciences in Scandinavia Lucy Robertshaw, LucyJRobertshaw 16.15 – Sweden Company Showcase   Chair: Lucy Robertshaw            Companies Presenting: Mattias Nystrom, APL Nima Jokilaakso, Swecare Anne Dorthe Madsen Brandt, Michael Wamberg and Ulrika Rosdahl, DB Lab Philip Ridley Smith, Cobra Biologics Anna Törner, Scandinavian Development Services Anna Fahlgren, BioReperia Albin Forslund, Visiba Care Anders Björlin, Kiwok Oliver Namin, Min Doktor 18.00 – Tea, Coffee and Networking 18.30 – Talk 19.00 – Panel Discussion on Digital Health João Bocas, Digital Salutem Garri Jones, Numis Nima Jokilaasko, Swecare 20.00 – Drinks and Networking 21.00 – Event Closes Programme subject to change Date:01 February 2017 Location: Olswang, 90 High Holborn, London WC1V 6XX   Original Post
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Digital Health, Wearables
About 50% of people who develop heart failure die within 5 years from the time of diagnosis. In 2009, it was studied that 1 in 9 deaths included heart failure as a contributor. For example, today, about 5.7 million adults in the US alone suffer from heart failure. And heart failure has cost that nation an estimated $30.7 billion every year. Each year, heart failure is responsible for 1 million hospitalizations in US. At the recent American Heart Association annual meeting in New Orleans (US), professor of medicine at Penn State College of Medicine, John Boehmer presented findings that adding a system of sensors to defibrillator implants may make it possible to predict the event of heart failure, potentially detecting it more than a month before they happen. A defibrillator is a battery-operated device that delivers an electric shock in the event that the patient’s heart stops beating.   In the course of a year, 900 patients who had suffered heart failure had researchers upload software to each patient’s implanted defibrillator. The uploaded software by HeartLogic™ Heart Failure Diagnostic Service monitors the patient’s heart rate, activity, electrical activities, and most importantly, it acted as a sensor predicting impending heart failure. During the period of study, 70 percent of heart failure events was detected by the suite of sensors. In most cases, the events were detected more than a month before the occurrence. The results far exceeded the researchers’ goal of reaching 40 percent detection while the false positives were well within acceptable range. “The primary endpoints were exceeded and demonstrated that this algorithm, which mimics the activity and analysis of a clinician by combining multiple measurements evaluating different aspects of heart physiology, is a strong predictor of heart failure events,” said John P. Boehmer, M.D., principal investigator and medical director of the Heart Failure Program at The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and The Penn State Hershey Medical Center. “The study illustrates compelling performance of the HeartLogic algorithm for the detection of worsening heart failure and lays the foundation for future studies of the alert in clinical practice.” “This is a new and clinically valuable measure of worsening heart failure, and it combines a number of measures of the physiology and heart failure, much like a doctor will look at a patient,” Boehmer says. “Doctors look at all their signs and symptoms, get some tests, and put it all together and make a decision about how well or ill the patient is. HeartLogic does it similarly.” “It integrates a number of measurements of what’s going on with the patient, including breathing, activity, and heart sounds, and puts that all together to give us an index that we believe is both sensitive and specific for heart failure.” Currently, the HeartLogic Heart Failure Diagnostic Service is not available to consumers or for sale. However, it doesn’t seem improbable that this wearable technology will someday be accessible to the digital health market considering the rate at which wearable technology and implantable are being produced and studied for consumer applications.  
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Digital Health
Ever since people started practicing medicine, the goal has been to get more information about what’s wrong with a patient and how to make it right. This has been at the heart of all change and innovation in health and care. But although there is a significant amount of data available today, and it’s doubling every 24 months – the problem currently facing the NHS isn’t having enough data, it’s getting access to, and reasoning over data easily, to provide actionable intelligence, and doing all of this in a cost-effective manner.

Why Microsoft?

They recognise that access to digital services is playing an increasing role across the NHS, helping to address the growing demand for NHS resources, disrupting health and care models, and providing the catalyst for new and improved patient engagement experiences. Micrsoft’s aim is to accelerate digital transformation across the NHS, by helping customers and health industry partners to deliver repeatable solutions that span local, regional and national care settings. They provide trusted technology platforms that enable health organisations across the UK to deliver end-to-end health and care scenarios, based on open interoperability standards, that are not only powerful, but also integrated, manageable and cost-effective.

Accelerating Digital Transformation in the NHS

For health and social care professionals, having timely access to all relevant information from across health and social care services is essential to delivering a high-quality care, ensuring the best possible outcomes for patients.  Empowering health and social care professionals with digital capabilities, strengthens collaboration and improves clinical and operational performance. To find out more about how Microsoft is helping NHS organisations transform, see recent examples below.

Customer Stories

East Kent connects patients with Careflow

A Trust wide clinical communications platform which transforms how healthcare teams work. The Careflow messaging platform provides a secure environment where teams across all healthcare settings can share patient-centric conversations. Careflow combines instant messages and mobile alerting to push vital patient information to care teams in real time.

Skype for Business helps SW London & St George’s NHS stay connected

Face to face consultations were not always convenient and this had led to cancelled and missed appointments, wasting valuable staff time and resources. Their solution was to empower patients with communication technology that would be convenient and would suit their busy lives.

Epilepsy patients are managing their lives with Microsoft technology

New innovative software has been developed by Poole Hospital, as part of a consortium of providers, to help patients with epilepsy and medical staff monitor their condition more easily.

NHS Blood and Transplant Scale with Azure

NHS Blood and transplant has harnessed Azure to develop an online booking service, plus an app for mobile devices, that accelerates the donor registration process from around a month under the previous system to a matter of hours.

Microsoft and the NHS

Microsoft is committed to helping NHS organisations move to more digitally enabled healthcare and have entered into an agreement with NHS Digital to offer special pricing tailored to the specific functionality requirements health and care teams working in the NHS.     Original Post
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Digital Health
Digital hospitals provide an incredible opportunity for the health care industry to improve their quality and safety of patient care significantly. Digital hospitals would support world-class clinical research while enabling better management and administration of the hospital environment.  These new facilities aim to reduce inefficiencies and wastage while offering a greener environment for both its patient and staff that is safer and healthier. Furthermore, digital hospitals would attract world-class talent in both medicine and healthcare management.  The benefits of a digital hospital have long been realized. However, the execution requires leadership and strategic planning. Hospitals all over the world are already under extreme pressure to consistently deliver the highest quality of care at the lowest possible cost. Patients expect to be treated quickly without spending beyond their cost structure.  Modernizing existing healthcare facilities into digital hospitals can take twice the amount of time it would take to construct a new hospital. But because of the costs required to build entirely new facilities, the only option may be to retrofit existing hospitals.  A properly designed and well-executed digital or “smart hospital” will not only have a positive effect on staff productivity and patient satisfaction but operating costs. One that is well-built and properly planned should have an infrastructure that is economically-friendly. These aren’t just smart hospitals, but they are intelligent buildings which are integrated with advanced IT, communication, medical and building technologies.  Digital hospitals go beyond just their physical infrastructures. An equipped digital hospital means advanced technologies that are automated with intelligent information systems, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), sensors, control systems for facilities and medical devices. A dedicated IT team will complement hospital medical staff in how the facility is run. It is a collaboration of systems, communication, infrastructure, and people that are integrated to make the digital hospital environment work. Communication will be unified thanks to a seamless exchange of audio, video, and data between patients and their doctors, staff, and any external healthcare providers or consultants.  When people, systems, and processes are seamlessly connected, the sharing of data is more effective leading to the efficient diagnostic, treatment, and management resulting in better business decisions. Efficiency is achieved when the right information and resources are delivered at the right time to the point of care. High-speed networking that is reliable is embedded in the systems interconnecting all the services of the facility.  The information communications technology requirements of a digital hospital are unique, unlike any other smart facility. Digital hospitals need to be run by a team of high-performing medical professionals, administrative staff, and a department of experts who oversee the ICT requirements for day-to-day digital health operations. 
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Digital Health, Wearables
Our international digital health and care ambassador, and recently-crowned world No1, Andy Murray, explains why he’s excited about the benefits the sector can provide to help everyone live better lives…
As a tennis player I’m always interested in anything that can improve my performance on court. The professional game is very competitive and anything that can help give you an advantage is important. We already use products in my training that monitor my performance during a strength and conditioning session or on court session and then those are analysed to see how I’m performing, what I need to work on and when I need to rest. I’ve been looking at various digital health technologies over the past couple of years as the industry develops and grows, and hopefully will be able to integrate more products into my routine and lifestyle as they come onto the market. One development I would like to see is something to speed up recovery times. The tennis tour is pretty relentless. We play all year round and often don’t have much time to recover between matches. My physios Shane and Mark are great at helping me get back on my feet after long games, but a tool that could help my body feel a bit less sore sometimes would be very helpful! I’m also interested generally in the area of wearable technology and will be watching this space carefully though as I think there may be developments that could help my performance on and off court. Of course, digital health can have benefits for everyone, not just professional athletes. I think people are showing more of an interest in their health and there are lots of simple tools that help them monitor their health and activities. Also they can give you fairly easy, achievable goals – like walking 10,000 steps a day that all of us should be able to do, and which can make a real improvement in things like heart health. When a product can really change people’s behaviour, that is an exciting step forward and a positive sign of things to come. For example, there is huge potential to tackle obesity through digital health and this is something that I’m really passionate about. In Scotland, there are major problems with obesity already and it’s getting worse, particularly in children. It was great to see how a game like Pokemon Go could get children moving. Hopefully the big gaming companies can work on more products like that that tackle a health issue but in a fun way to engage young people. The way this sector is going I think it’s going to be huge. The fact that we’ve got organisations like the DHI promoting the sector and securing funding to instigate more digital health projects is going to really help the industry grow. I also work with Seedrs, a crowd funding platform that supports up and coming entrepreneurs and they are seeing more and more digital health projects coming live. It’s a very exciting time to be involved in this area. Thanks for reading, Andy   Original Post
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Digital Health, Wearables
In the last few years digital health has come a long way. This new emerging industry is here to stay, we can see healthcare innovations evolving extremely fast. Many experts have predicted digital health platforms and social media networks as the main trends in 2016. As every year, industry insiders choose their favorite technologies and business models. In this case, we are talking about an industry at his infancy, this making difficult to figure out what will happen in the next 12 months. Less than 18 months ago, a surge of digital health startups was reported. However industry experts defended that 98% of digital health start ups are zombies , this fact clearly reflects that innovating in healthcare is a very tall task. Personally, I recognize that nothing is setting stone when it comes to digital health innovation, based on my regular discussions in this industry, I share with you my five most secret (and crazy) predictions: 1) Exits: There are great success stories: amazing digital health companies are obtaining concrete results and scaling up. In 2016 we witnessed exciting moves in the industry; as examples: Nokia acquiring Withings for $191million and Misfit was sold to Fossil Group for $260 million. I’m expecting to see some more acquisitions and relevant exits, maybe an “unicorn” from the digital health industry. 2) New Emerging Technologies: This is the other side of the moon in tech, I saw many technologies doing a great job in 2016, however in 2017 I would like to highlight some more innovative and pretense tech that will influence healthcare with great results. Virtually Reality ( #VR ) is certainly up there, we are now seen a huge flux of #VR startups, and that’s not a coincidence….the potential is enormous. The challenge remains around business models and practical application, although great innovators are already doing great work and taking giant steps. Take a look at Dr. Shafi Ahmed , he is already using #VR live in his surgery rooms. More insights can be found at Medical Realities . 3) Connected Health: My two cents are on any digital solutions ( hardware or software ) that uses tools, wearables and sensors for collecting health data. The Wearables are now a common denominator that will assist connectivity between human being and machines. However Wearables are not novice in connected health, they have been around for a few years now.  My prediction is that connected cars will present the biggest opportunity for healthcare through Automotive Health. A crazy prediction…? Read more how connected cars will change lives . Let’s consider one of the most mature use cases: auto insurance telematics in UK, which represents one of the best practices globally. There are now almost 455,000 drivers in the UK with a telematics ‘black box’ fitted in their car, this can be used as a capability to be applied in health, however many new intelligent cars offer other ways to connect. 4) Wearables , Sensors or just clothing : wearables  started to be used in clinical trials in 2016 and this is a major breakthrough for healthcare. Read a case study here regarding correlation and context . In 2016 I noticed truly advances in wearable tech innovations, more intelligent, smaller, with more functionalities in one single device and much more. But Sensors are the “ Wearables of the Future “ or are they ? Check this innovative company – Profusa is developing a new generation of biointegrated sensors that empower an individual to continuously monitor their unique body chemistry – check how here . 5) Genomics: In the last 12 months personalized medicine or precision medicine are certainly not stranger terms for those working in healthcare innovation. Genomics offers exactly that, the opportunity to personalize health. Human Genomics are a growing industry with more innovators offering solutions to healthcare. A Spanish start up caught my eye in 2016, they are made of genes , offering a combination of technology, genomics and ( AI ) artificial intelligence. More Genomics innovations are expected in 2017.   To round round up the article in a controversial way, I would like to ask you to imagine what if….Wearables, Sensors and any other any similar wearable tech will become absolute in the near future. Is clothing the biggest and better opportunity to innovate? Blending Human need , Fashion , Tech and Health all in one piece….time will tell us. This is an exciting time to be working in the digital health innovation industry, actually! I hope you have enjoyed reading the article as much I enjoyed writing it.
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