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Big Data, Digital Health, Fitness, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Sensors, Wearables
European regulators bring concern for start-ups that plan to sell their fitness and tracking devices to the corporate customer. Last June the European Advisory Panel stated that employers should be banned from giving their employees wearable tracking devices such as fitness monitors and smartwatches to track their employees’ health. Additionally the EU body also made it clear that employers should stay clear of accessing and using the data these devices create, even if the data is completely anonymous and employees gave their permission. Understandably, start-ups but also more established players are concerned, as are their corporate clients who use this data to improve their employee health and decrease medical insurance premiums. Fitbit states that employees should surely be informed about the uses of the generated date, who will have access and given the option to participate or not without any consequences for refusal. However the EU body sticks with its point. They find that even such transparency is  most likely insufficient. ““Given the unequal relationship between employers and employees,” the body said, workers were probably never able to give legally valid consent to have their data shared. “Even if the employer uses a third party to collect the health data, which would only provide aggregated information about general health developments to the employer, the processing would still be unlawful.”” – (Jeremy Kahn – 2017) Fitbit has a large stake in this but declined giving a direct comment on the opinion of the EU privacy groups. However Fitbit did state that they believe all wellness programs should protect the employees’ privacy and be voluntary. The company has over 1.300 organizations, encompassing more than 2,6 million people, using its devices for their corporate wellness program. These companies are concerned that  their employees spent too much time sitting and want to encourage them to move more. Nokia purchased Withings in 2015 and build their corporate wellness program Nokia Digital Health around it. Alex Normand, head of B2B sales of Nokia Digital Health stated: “We believe the responsible integration of connected health devices into the health care system, including through corporate wellness programs, has the potential to significantly improve the health and well-being of society, and are actively working with hospitals, research institutions, and health care providers to explore this promising field,”. He also stated they Nokia would abide by all applicable law and would uphold the highest standards of privacy and security in every market it sells. Move coach shares aggregated data, such as fitness levels and demographic age with consent of the users. The company Salesforce, LinkedIn and Microsoft Corp. With an eye on this new ‘EU opinion’ it is concerned that it will not be able to serve its European customers. Frank Palermo, head of solutions at Virtusa, a consultancy firm within connected devices and wearables, states that “Collecting data on worker activity and productivity to ensure their safety should be in the purview of the employer,”. Statement of the EU body is just an opinion, at least for now. This means that in the end it is up to each individual country to decide whether they want to comply or not with this opinion. However per May 2018, European regulations will become more streamlined and the New General Data Protection Regulation will be enforced. In this regulation it states that business are required to carry out impact assessments before implementing any technology or procedure into their company which may pose a risk to individual privacy rights. They are also required to select the most privacy friendly solutions. To finalize I just want to state that not everyone is concerned or disagrees with this opinion of the EU body. BioBeats, a company that uses wearable sensors and applications to better manage the employees stress levels, never gave companies access to their data. Therefore, CEO David Plans, stated that this regulation would give BioBeats more space to compete within the market. He finds that “The only thing that should ever reach the employer is our analysis of the data, not the data itself.”   This post is based on the following article – Fitness Tracking Startups Are Sweating Due To EU Privacy Regulations
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Innovation, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Wearables
Say Hello To Your AI Doctor. Technology has been moving fast, realizing dreams from virtual reality glasses to self-driving cars. Health technology however is a different story. Where humans have always dreamed big, fantasizing about better, longer-lasting bodies and more effective and less expensive healthcare, technology has lagged behind. keep reading
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Digital Health, Healthcare
value-based-healthcare Value Based Healthcare is essential for digital health. Healthcare cost comprise approximately 10% of the worlds GDP. For some Western countries, such as the US, this percentage is even higher, about 18%. Through the ageing population and growing demands and needs healthcare cost continue to rise, outpacing growth of household and national incomes. This unsustainable growth in cost is one of the biggest challenges of this age. Worldwide political conversations are dominated and polarized by it. How are we going to pay for it, Who is going to pay for it and how do we make the healthcare system future proof? These questions are at the centre of the discussion and still in need for an answer. One of the answers may be the Value Based Healthcare (VBHC) approach. The current system strives for high quantity, simply put, the more patients you cure the more money you receive. This results in a fragmented healthcare system with health providers unwilling to work together. value-based-healthcare The VBHC approach however does not strive to minimize cost or maximise quantity, it strives to maximise the value of care. This is defined as patient outcomes divided by the costs. Worldwide leading healthcare systems are documenting and reporting variations in clinical practice and health outcomes. Therewith best practices can be identified by clinicians, whom could steer resources towards the clinical interventions which achieve the best results. Through this focus on value, the value based healthcare approach delivers higher quality of patient outcomes for equal or lower cost, and could thus be part of the solution. However in order to deliver this promise and be able to make difficult decisions about the types of care and which pharmaceuticals can be offered with it, makes a scientific, detailed, evidence-based approach essential. Therefore some important steps need to be included in the process. For a VBHC approach one needs to have a detailed analysis of existing outcome date, best practices need to be identified and these then need to be widespread and shared amongst healthcare providers in order to reduce variations and improve the overall health outcomes. value-based-healthcare This is why the healthcare providers cannot do it alone. They need help from the digital health industry. Healthcare providers generate enormous amounts of raw data but are often unable to analyses and order that data in the way that is needed for VBCH. In the business space of Digital Health by contrast, this is one of its main components and best practices. They could use their resources to generate the clinical, payment and quality insight which is required for the growth of value based digital health. Thus, VBHC, choosing quality over quantity while minimizing cost, seems like a win/win for both the patients, healthcare providers and governments. The solutions are not all there yet, but they are coming and value based healthcare is a great example of one.   This article is based on – The Digital Mission of Healthcare: Value Based Care
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Big Data, Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Wearables
  How can stakeholders harness the potential of healthcare wearables to revolutionise the care continuum while successfully navigating legislative and technical risks? HealthManagement.org spoke to Global Top 100 Digital Health Influencer, João Bocas for his insights. keep reading
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Digital Health, Events, Healthcare, Innovation, Internet Of Things IoT, Wearables
  Last week was the third edition of Smart Summit London. Smart Summit London is Europe’s leading IoT and connected living event. The conference attracts attendees from all over the world from diverse fields. From government to smart home OEMs as well as telecom operators, healthcare organizations, insurance or semiconductor companies. keep reading
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth
“There is no turning around it. The ubiquity of wireless technology and the strong need to transform healthcare will most certainly intersect!” -(pwc). About 10 years ago mHealth conferences were no more than a few people occasionally meeting in jeans. Now it is seen as the biggest technological breakthrough in healthcare which has the keep reading
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Partnerships, Wearables
Onalytica, a top player in the market of providing Influencer Relationship Management software and supporting professional services to help brands scale 1-to-1 Influencer Relationship Management results, published the latest top 100 influencers, brands and publications. keep reading
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