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Digital Health, Healthcare, mHealth, Wearables
There’s no denying that the popularity of wearables is gaining momentum. However, manufacturers are aiming to go beyond being mere fitness gadgets and a technological trend to becoming accepted as valued medical devices utilized by the healthcare sector. It’s a new beginning of Wearables in Healthcare. keep reading
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth
  The use of Internet of Things in Healthcare is going to be revolutionary in the next years. IoT is now pretty much in everything we touch in our modern lives, technology is now a common denominator in most of everybody’s life. IoT is seeing by many sceptics and conservatives as a buzz word, however we truly believe that IoT is more than that. IoT in Healthcare has an enormous potential, but practical applications are crucial in order to represent value and impactful delivery. In Healthcare innovation is extremely important to consider user-driven innovation for big and small problems, in order to achieve true systematic disruption organisations challenge existent paradigms and find new radical solutions that clearly show value creation. Doctors and care facilities, such as hospitals, assisted living centres and outpatient clinics are increasingly using advanced technologies to improve their operations and patient care. That the IoT is becoming an fundamental part of society and healthcare is also seen in the numbers.  keep reading
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth
It’s relevant to understand the state of the healthcare industry. For this reason, Siemens Healthineers asked Harvard Business Analytics Services to survey healthcare professionals (decision makers, influencers and managers) to gain insight into key industry trends. The survey garnered 613 respondents of which 85% worked in healthcare, the remaining 15% comprised consultants with clients from the healthcare industry. keep reading
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Innovation, mHealth
There are some problems related with Digital Health Transformation. It is so normal in our digital age, the focus on technology is highlighting developments and innovations. When modernizing healthcare however, this emphasizes on technology is overshadowing the real centre of where change needs to happen… people. digital health transformation Digital health transformation is by many presumed to be about transferring vast amounts of data and having technology as “ready to go” solution. Healthcare however is a people business, centring around the needs and desires of humans giving and receiving care. This makes that when it comes to making digital health transformation happen, the difficulties do not lie with building the right technology, but with the behaviour changes that need to happen. This makes that first step to successful digital health transformation is to understand the problems of digital health transformation lying underneath.

Understand the problem

This seems very simple but is often harder than you think. For example, when healthcare providers would like the system of patient recording to change from let’s say paper to electronic. It might seem like you have fixed the problem by implementing the newest electronic system that enhances access, with lots of different options and shining innovative attributes. However, when asking  why they want the system changed and what the specific problems are with the current system, you might find out that for care givers a simple system, with fewer options and a user friendly interface is key to perform their jobs effective and efficiently. In that case, your beautiful new system would be far from desired. “It’s about finding the pain points and determining how that translates to the needs of caregivers or patients.” – (Travis Good, 2017)

Make the technology fit into the workflows

After you have a clear understanding of the problem it is key to gain insight into how the technology will fit into the workflow of the healthcare provider. Try looking at the work as an operation project rather than an IT project. This ensures that the technology will be aligned with the strategic initiatives and objectives of the overall department. An example, a project around operating procedures replacing hips and knees. Having an IT perspective we might focus on gathering the data from the electronic health records to improve the inventory levels of replacement joints which boosts the return on investment by sterilizing fewer equipment, reduction in employee costs and other efficiencies. This of course would already help a lot. However, taking an operation project perspective and while speaking with operational people, the director of the OR for example, you might find out that there are additional department goals which could be well implemented in this system. Think about accurate and timely data to help with budgeting or supply chain management.

Standardize your Digital Health Transformation

Healthcare systems are often highly complex and interlinked with various systems and processes. Therefore, to successfully implement digital health, standardization is key. The technology tool itself but also the processes and support systems around it, such as training and compliance need to be interlinked and standardized. This can reduce complexity each time another application is added to the ecosystem and therewith creates system sustainability. When deciding whether or not to add a new technology, standardization should be applied as well. A piece of technology can be highly innovative and change the way care is provided, however the new IT might not be suitable to be built into the existing system. There should be a process in place to understand whether it is a smart long-term investment. The digital health conversation is dominated by technology but most people working outside IT do not know what is possible in this field. This makes that for doctors for example it is hard to formulate what exactly the technology should do. Using the technology such as documentation tools for people to type into, costs them time away with patients. Especially since IT people build the systems without a clear value proposition, healthcare professionals complain since they have all the data but are not using it. For this reason discussions needs to change. More non-technological and subject related experts need to sit around the table. Information need to be gained from the people technology is serving, patients, doctors and nurses. What are they experiencing, what would truly benefit them and how would it fit their needs, desires and ways of working. “In the short term, having more voices around the table won’t necessarily make the process of transformation more efficient. But, in the long-term, broadening beyond a technology discussion will be necessary.”(Travis Good, 2017) If we truly want successful digital health transformation and receive the benefits from such systems, we need to go back to the before the time of the tower of babel and try to speak the same language, understanding each other.   Click here to view the article this post is based upon.
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Big Data, Digital Health, Events, Fitness, Healthcare, Innovation, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Partnerships, Wearables
  It is with pride that we would like to announce the 2nd anniversary of Digital Salutem!! November 2 years ago we started with a mission to change digital healthcare innovation whilst having a positive impact on businesses and society. Our multidisciplinary group of digital health experts worked hard and we achieved a lot. We connected and collaborated with some amazing clients including a few of the most innovative health insurers in Europe and Nokia Health, a recognised world class innovator in digital health. But that is far from all. digital health consultant It was an exciting year and as always we attended a variety of industry events including; Our CEO, João Bocas, shared his knowledge and innovative mind during these events. Speaking about the challenges and opportunities digital health brings and closely watching the trends and developments in the market we state that this year the battle to change healthcare has kicked off somewhat stronger than the previous years. 2017 is the year of new wearable insights. This year’s prediction of the device market give an compound annual growth (CAGR) of 22,2% until 2021. That means that by 2021 262,5 million wearables are to be shipped worldwide. In 2016 this wasn’t even half, 96,5 million. This marks a big milestone in the market of digital health. digital health As for us, Digital Salutem, we continued our good work and stepped up our game this year in terms of growth and brand recognition. Not only was our CEO, João Bocas, named as top 100 global digital health influencer, our brand, Digital Salutem, was likewise named in the top 50 global brands in digital health! Our network now comprises over 10.000 influential contacts in over 20 different countries and we since short started a new collaboration with London South Bank University. Here we support the delivery of simDH (Simulation for digital health) program, helping healthTech startups to have a greater chance of succeeding in the complex and volatile healthcare market. We are looking forward to this new year. Having extended our portfolio, knowledge, team and increased the brand awareness we expect to be able to help even more organisations reach their health innovation goals. Bringing people together, ensuring proper solution-based innovation and disruptive change in healthcare is what we strive for. We are part of something bigger than us and are sure that with Digital Salutem and our partners we can create the incredible, valuable and needed change in healthcare.digital healthcare innovation Lastly, we are extremely excited about a new partnership with a leading world-class innovator from Denmark. To be announced soon……!! I hope you are as excited as we are about the future and as always, feel free to contact us at any time for any questions or advice. As well our Managing Director, Miguel Sánchiz, will be delighted to receive an email from you. Contact with him via miguel@digitalsalutem.com  
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth
  Like Digital Health, Social Media is not about the exploitation of technology but about its service to the community. Moreover, I like to state that Social Media is actually contributing to digital health. Within the healthcare landscape it is facilitating a new platform for patient-doctor communication and global participatory discussions. keep reading
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Big Data, Digital Health, Fitness, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Sensors, Wearables
European regulators bring concern for start-ups that plan to sell their fitness and tracking devices to the corporate customer. Last June the European Advisory Panel stated that employers should be banned from giving their employees wearable tracking devices such as fitness monitors and smartwatches to track their employees’ health. Additionally the EU body also made it clear that employers should stay clear of accessing and using the data these devices create, even if the data is completely anonymous and employees gave their permission. Understandably, start-ups but also more established players are concerned, as are their corporate clients who use this data to improve their employee health and decrease medical insurance premiums. Fitbit states that employees should surely be informed about the uses of the generated date, who will have access and given the option to participate or not without any consequences for refusal. However the EU body sticks with its point. They find that even such transparency is  most likely insufficient. ““Given the unequal relationship between employers and employees,” the body said, workers were probably never able to give legally valid consent to have their data shared. “Even if the employer uses a third party to collect the health data, which would only provide aggregated information about general health developments to the employer, the processing would still be unlawful.”” – (Jeremy Kahn – 2017) Fitbit has a large stake in this but declined giving a direct comment on the opinion of the EU privacy groups. However Fitbit did state that they believe all wellness programs should protect the employees’ privacy and be voluntary. The company has over 1.300 organizations, encompassing more than 2,6 million people, using its devices for their corporate wellness program. These companies are concerned that  their employees spent too much time sitting and want to encourage them to move more. Nokia purchased Withings in 2015 and build their corporate wellness program Nokia Digital Health around it. Alex Normand, head of B2B sales of Nokia Digital Health stated: “We believe the responsible integration of connected health devices into the health care system, including through corporate wellness programs, has the potential to significantly improve the health and well-being of society, and are actively working with hospitals, research institutions, and health care providers to explore this promising field,”. He also stated they Nokia would abide by all applicable law and would uphold the highest standards of privacy and security in every market it sells. Move coach shares aggregated data, such as fitness levels and demographic age with consent of the users. The company Salesforce, LinkedIn and Microsoft Corp. With an eye on this new ‘EU opinion’ it is concerned that it will not be able to serve its European customers. Frank Palermo, head of solutions at Virtusa, a consultancy firm within connected devices and wearables, states that “Collecting data on worker activity and productivity to ensure their safety should be in the purview of the employer,”. Statement of the EU body is just an opinion, at least for now. This means that in the end it is up to each individual country to decide whether they want to comply or not with this opinion. However per May 2018, European regulations will become more streamlined and the New General Data Protection Regulation will be enforced. In this regulation it states that business are required to carry out impact assessments before implementing any technology or procedure into their company which may pose a risk to individual privacy rights. They are also required to select the most privacy friendly solutions. To finalize I just want to state that not everyone is concerned or disagrees with this opinion of the EU body. BioBeats, a company that uses wearable sensors and applications to better manage the employees stress levels, never gave companies access to their data. Therefore, CEO David Plans, stated that this regulation would give BioBeats more space to compete within the market. He finds that “The only thing that should ever reach the employer is our analysis of the data, not the data itself.”   This post is based on the following article – Fitness Tracking Startups Are Sweating Due To EU Privacy Regulations
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Innovation, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Wearables
Say Hello To Your AI Doctor. Technology has been moving fast, realizing dreams from virtual reality glasses to self-driving cars. Health technology however is a different story. Where humans have always dreamed big, fantasizing about better, longer-lasting bodies and more effective and less expensive healthcare, technology has lagged behind. keep reading
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