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Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth
  Like Digital Health, Social Media is not about the exploitation of technology but about its service to the community. Moreover, I like to state that Social Media is actually contributing to digital health. Within the healthcare landscape it is facilitating a new platform for patient-doctor communication and global participatory discussions. keep reading
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Big Data, Digital Health, Fitness, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Sensors, Wearables
European regulators bring concern for start-ups that plan to sell their fitness and tracking devices to the corporate customer. Last June the European Advisory Panel stated that employers should be banned from giving their employees wearable tracking devices such as fitness monitors and smartwatches to track their employees’ health. Additionally the EU body also made it clear that employers should stay clear of accessing and using the data these devices create, even if the data is completely anonymous and employees gave their permission. Understandably, start-ups but also more established players are concerned, as are their corporate clients who use this data to improve their employee health and decrease medical insurance premiums. Fitbit states that employees should surely be informed about the uses of the generated date, who will have access and given the option to participate or not without any consequences for refusal. However the EU body sticks with its point. They find that even such transparency is  most likely insufficient. ““Given the unequal relationship between employers and employees,” the body said, workers were probably never able to give legally valid consent to have their data shared. “Even if the employer uses a third party to collect the health data, which would only provide aggregated information about general health developments to the employer, the processing would still be unlawful.”” – (Jeremy Kahn – 2017) Fitbit has a large stake in this but declined giving a direct comment on the opinion of the EU privacy groups. However Fitbit did state that they believe all wellness programs should protect the employees’ privacy and be voluntary. The company has over 1.300 organizations, encompassing more than 2,6 million people, using its devices for their corporate wellness program. These companies are concerned that  their employees spent too much time sitting and want to encourage them to move more. Nokia purchased Withings in 2015 and build their corporate wellness program Nokia Digital Health around it. Alex Normand, head of B2B sales of Nokia Digital Health stated: “We believe the responsible integration of connected health devices into the health care system, including through corporate wellness programs, has the potential to significantly improve the health and well-being of society, and are actively working with hospitals, research institutions, and health care providers to explore this promising field,”. He also stated they Nokia would abide by all applicable law and would uphold the highest standards of privacy and security in every market it sells. Move coach shares aggregated data, such as fitness levels and demographic age with consent of the users. The company Salesforce, LinkedIn and Microsoft Corp. With an eye on this new ‘EU opinion’ it is concerned that it will not be able to serve its European customers. Frank Palermo, head of solutions at Virtusa, a consultancy firm within connected devices and wearables, states that “Collecting data on worker activity and productivity to ensure their safety should be in the purview of the employer,”. Statement of the EU body is just an opinion, at least for now. This means that in the end it is up to each individual country to decide whether they want to comply or not with this opinion. However per May 2018, European regulations will become more streamlined and the New General Data Protection Regulation will be enforced. In this regulation it states that business are required to carry out impact assessments before implementing any technology or procedure into their company which may pose a risk to individual privacy rights. They are also required to select the most privacy friendly solutions. To finalize I just want to state that not everyone is concerned or disagrees with this opinion of the EU body. BioBeats, a company that uses wearable sensors and applications to better manage the employees stress levels, never gave companies access to their data. Therefore, CEO David Plans, stated that this regulation would give BioBeats more space to compete within the market. He finds that “The only thing that should ever reach the employer is our analysis of the data, not the data itself.”   This post is based on the following article – Fitness Tracking Startups Are Sweating Due To EU Privacy Regulations
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Innovation, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Wearables
Say Hello To Your AI Doctor. Technology has been moving fast, realizing dreams from virtual reality glasses to self-driving cars. Health technology however is a different story. Where humans have always dreamed big, fantasizing about better, longer-lasting bodies and more effective and less expensive healthcare, technology has lagged behind. keep reading
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Big Data, Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth, Wearables
  How can stakeholders harness the potential of healthcare wearables to revolutionise the care continuum while successfully navigating legislative and technical risks? HealthManagement.org spoke to Global Top 100 Digital Health Influencer, João Bocas for his insights. keep reading
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Digital Health, Healthcare, Internet Of Things IoT, mHealth
“There is no turning around it. The ubiquity of wireless technology and the strong need to transform healthcare will most certainly intersect!” -(pwc). About 10 years ago mHealth conferences were no more than a few people occasionally meeting in jeans. Now it is seen as the biggest technological breakthrough in healthcare which has the keep reading
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Digital Health, Fitness, mHealth, Sensors, Trends 2017, Wearables
  The movement within the wearable market is very clear. Demand makes that wearables are becoming less expensive and increasingly commoditized. Just better sensors is now no longer enough. Wearables need to be smarter and more useful. They need to analyse multiple data at once, or so to say, be more holistic. To do so, many wearable makers all over the world are focusing on AI-powered devices. However, there are still few areas where wearables (and its sensors) can have a differentiating impact for both the consumer and the clinical world. One surprising area, which can have this differentiating impact, is the area of sweat monitoring. Developing under the radar, sweat sensors have matured rapidly and are attracting increased investments as these technologies move quickly from lab to commercialization. Whispers on social media about the impact of these sensors are valid. As we see it, sweat is the future blood. Sweat gives access to a broad range of data. It can measure:
  • Biomarkers like sodium
  • Heath related issues like fluid loss leading to dehydration.
  • Potassium levels (affecting hearth beat)
  • Glucose level
And you don’t even have to prick your finger for measuring!! “Kenzen, a developer of a next-generation wearables platform that continuously monitors, predicts and prevents avoidable health conditions using non-invasive sweat analysis has raised $5 million in funding. Kenzen’s ECHO smart wearable patch continuously uses non-invasive sweat analysis to measure vital signs and motion sensors to predict and prevent avoidable injuries and illness. ECHO only needs the smallest micro-bead to perform an analysis of key biomarkers. Beyond water, this concentration includes electrolytes like sodium, metabolites, glucose, various molecules and proteins.”(Jasmine Pennic, 06/05/2017) wearables trends With this data we could completely change the way we diagnose and monitor health. It could optimize performance, prevent injuries from happening (by giving an alert when sodium levels are too low for example), give early notification before we get sick and with that save billions of dollars in healthcare. Some would say, the reason for health wearables to be here in the first place. Therefore, experts believe that sweat sensors could take health wearables to the next level. Well.. Only time will tell. The wearables have certainly come a long way since early innovations appeared in the market 10 years ago. We can witness powerful capabilities and multifunctional features, these articles are a reflection of that. A reduction in size, increased capabilities, enrichment in data sets and implantable techniques using sensors, are increasingly exploited.   Articles Used: The Most Surprising Wearable Trend Q2 2017 Sweat Is The New Blood: Why Sweat Analysis Is The Next Gen Of Wearable Diagnostics.

Kenzen Raises $5M to Expand Real-Time Sweat Analysis Wearable That Measures Biometrics.

 
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