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Events, Wearables
The Wearable Technology Show returns to London in March for its fourth outing with a strengthened focus on digital health, 6,000 attendees in its sights, global leaders and influencers on its 200-speaker strong conference programme and over 100 exhibitors showcasing the latest innovations in smart technology.
The fourth Wearable Technology Show takes place 7-8 March at ExCeL and is co-located with the AR, VR & MXR Show, IOT Connect and the brand new Digital Health Technology Show, making it Europe’s biggest event for wearables, AR & VR, IOT and connected technology. Keynote Speakers already confirmed for 2017 include the following:
  • Vincent Nida, Global Brand President, L’Oreal
  • Greg Ivanov, Business Head, Google Daydream
  • Rachel Murphy, Digital Delivery Director, NHS Digital
  • Steve Moore, Director of Connected Home, Dixons Carphone
And more! 100 exhibitors from more than 20 countries will be on the show floor unveiling brand new products and prototypes, many of which will never have been seen before in Europe. For example:
  • MyndPlay
  • Navdy
  • Stretchsense
  • Glass Up
  • Touch Surgery
  • E-Sense
  • Proximie
  • Activbody

Date:

07-08 March 2017

Location: ExCeL London, Royal Victoria Dock, 1 Western Gateway, London, E16 1XL United Kingdom
Contact with us for 30% Discount: miguel@digitalsalutem.com

See you there! Wearable Technology Show

The UK’s showcase for new technology

Since 2014, The Wearable Technology Show has been THE event for the latest in wearables and connected technology. Companies both large and small have benefited from the show’s stellar press coverage – with sort ups in particular enjoying TV and press coverage they could have only dreamed of prior to exhibiting at our show. Companies have gone on to appear on Dragons Den, Channel 9 News Australia, and been snapped up by investors across the globe. And for companies from overseas, looking to establish their business in Europe, and to increase awareness in the UK, there could be no better platform. Take a look at some of the coverage we’ve enjoyed below ; and if you are interested in getting your product and business in front of 300 press at the 2017 event, then please get in touch – but hurry – the last stands are set to be snapped up!
The Gadget Show will cover the event again in 2017. last year, over a million people viewed the episode covering our event.
According to BBC Click, The Wearable Technology Show “had it all.” in 2016. Their film was seen by over 3 million on TV and online
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Digital Health, Internet Of Things IoT, Wearables
The Kaiser Family Foundation provided a table of Population Distribution by Age in the United States showing that in 2016 there was a total of 88,681,600 people age 55 and over. Of those, 47,456,500 fell into the “senior citizen” bracket and were 65 years old and over. The projected number of senior citizens by 2020 will be 56 million. keep reading
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Digital Health, Wearables
2016 saw us have fruitful collaborations between One Nucleus and Swedish collaborators on topics such as Digital Health, innovation in pharmaceutical science, the future of the Swedish and Danish Life Sciences and biomanufacturing. The collaboration continues with Sweden Showcase and BioWednesday London, as One Nucleus showcase nine leading companies and initiatives from Sweden in order to highlight potential business opportunities to the One Nucleus network. The showcasing will be followed by a UK-Sweden discussion on current investment trends and future of wearables in healthcare. There is an apparent shift in emphasis from investors, away from consumer wellness applications to clinically driven solutions that drive better health outcomes at lower cost. The panel at this event will discuss if this trend is indicative that there are greater opportunities for value creation for those wishing to develop solutions that help clinicians, patients and payers than for those focussing on wellness applications alone.
Programme 15.30 – Registration 16.00 – Welcome from One Nucleus and Host Tony Jones, One Nucleus Niall McAlister, Olswang 16.10 – Update on Life Sciences in Scandinavia Lucy Robertshaw, LucyJRobertshaw 16.15 – Sweden Company Showcase   Chair: Lucy Robertshaw            Companies Presenting: Mattias Nystrom, APL Nima Jokilaakso, Swecare Anne Dorthe Madsen Brandt, Michael Wamberg and Ulrika Rosdahl, DB Lab Philip Ridley Smith, Cobra Biologics Anna Törner, Scandinavian Development Services Anna Fahlgren, BioReperia Albin Forslund, Visiba Care Anders Björlin, Kiwok Oliver Namin, Min Doktor 18.00 – Tea, Coffee and Networking 18.30 – Talk 19.00 – Panel Discussion on Digital Health João Bocas, Digital Salutem Garri Jones, Numis Nima Jokilaasko, Swecare 20.00 – Drinks and Networking 21.00 – Event Closes Programme subject to change Date:01 February 2017 Location: Olswang, 90 High Holborn, London WC1V 6XX   Original Post
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Digital Health, Wearables
About 50% of people who develop heart failure die within 5 years from the time of diagnosis. In 2009, it was studied that 1 in 9 deaths included heart failure as a contributor. For example, today, about 5.7 million adults in the US alone suffer from heart failure. And heart failure has cost that nation an estimated $30.7 billion every year. Each year, heart failure is responsible for 1 million hospitalizations in US. At the recent American Heart Association annual meeting in New Orleans (US), professor of medicine at Penn State College of Medicine, John Boehmer presented findings that adding a system of sensors to defibrillator implants may make it possible to predict the event of heart failure, potentially detecting it more than a month before they happen. A defibrillator is a battery-operated device that delivers an electric shock in the event that the patient’s heart stops beating.   In the course of a year, 900 patients who had suffered heart failure had researchers upload software to each patient’s implanted defibrillator. The uploaded software by HeartLogic™ Heart Failure Diagnostic Service monitors the patient’s heart rate, activity, electrical activities, and most importantly, it acted as a sensor predicting impending heart failure. During the period of study, 70 percent of heart failure events was detected by the suite of sensors. In most cases, the events were detected more than a month before the occurrence. The results far exceeded the researchers’ goal of reaching 40 percent detection while the false positives were well within acceptable range. “The primary endpoints were exceeded and demonstrated that this algorithm, which mimics the activity and analysis of a clinician by combining multiple measurements evaluating different aspects of heart physiology, is a strong predictor of heart failure events,” said John P. Boehmer, M.D., principal investigator and medical director of the Heart Failure Program at The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and The Penn State Hershey Medical Center. “The study illustrates compelling performance of the HeartLogic algorithm for the detection of worsening heart failure and lays the foundation for future studies of the alert in clinical practice.” “This is a new and clinically valuable measure of worsening heart failure, and it combines a number of measures of the physiology and heart failure, much like a doctor will look at a patient,” Boehmer says. “Doctors look at all their signs and symptoms, get some tests, and put it all together and make a decision about how well or ill the patient is. HeartLogic does it similarly.” “It integrates a number of measurements of what’s going on with the patient, including breathing, activity, and heart sounds, and puts that all together to give us an index that we believe is both sensitive and specific for heart failure.” Currently, the HeartLogic Heart Failure Diagnostic Service is not available to consumers or for sale. However, it doesn’t seem improbable that this wearable technology will someday be accessible to the digital health market considering the rate at which wearable technology and implantable are being produced and studied for consumer applications.  
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Digital Health, Wearables
Our international digital health and care ambassador, and recently-crowned world No1, Andy Murray, explains why he’s excited about the benefits the sector can provide to help everyone live better lives…
As a tennis player I’m always interested in anything that can improve my performance on court. The professional game is very competitive and anything that can help give you an advantage is important. We already use products in my training that monitor my performance during a strength and conditioning session or on court session and then those are analysed to see how I’m performing, what I need to work on and when I need to rest. I’ve been looking at various digital health technologies over the past couple of years as the industry develops and grows, and hopefully will be able to integrate more products into my routine and lifestyle as they come onto the market. One development I would like to see is something to speed up recovery times. The tennis tour is pretty relentless. We play all year round and often don’t have much time to recover between matches. My physios Shane and Mark are great at helping me get back on my feet after long games, but a tool that could help my body feel a bit less sore sometimes would be very helpful! I’m also interested generally in the area of wearable technology and will be watching this space carefully though as I think there may be developments that could help my performance on and off court. Of course, digital health can have benefits for everyone, not just professional athletes. I think people are showing more of an interest in their health and there are lots of simple tools that help them monitor their health and activities. Also they can give you fairly easy, achievable goals – like walking 10,000 steps a day that all of us should be able to do, and which can make a real improvement in things like heart health. When a product can really change people’s behaviour, that is an exciting step forward and a positive sign of things to come. For example, there is huge potential to tackle obesity through digital health and this is something that I’m really passionate about. In Scotland, there are major problems with obesity already and it’s getting worse, particularly in children. It was great to see how a game like Pokemon Go could get children moving. Hopefully the big gaming companies can work on more products like that that tackle a health issue but in a fun way to engage young people. The way this sector is going I think it’s going to be huge. The fact that we’ve got organisations like the DHI promoting the sector and securing funding to instigate more digital health projects is going to really help the industry grow. I also work with Seedrs, a crowd funding platform that supports up and coming entrepreneurs and they are seeing more and more digital health projects coming live. It’s a very exciting time to be involved in this area. Thanks for reading, Andy   Original Post
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Digital Health, Wearables
In the last few years digital health has come a long way. This new emerging industry is here to stay, we can see healthcare innovations evolving extremely fast. Many experts have predicted digital health platforms and social media networks as the main trends in 2016. As every year, industry insiders choose their favorite technologies and business models. In this case, we are talking about an industry at his infancy, this making difficult to figure out what will happen in the next 12 months. Less than 18 months ago, a surge of digital health startups was reported. However industry experts defended that 98% of digital health start ups are zombies , this fact clearly reflects that innovating in healthcare is a very tall task. Personally, I recognize that nothing is setting stone when it comes to digital health innovation, based on my regular discussions in this industry, I share with you my five most secret (and crazy) predictions: 1) Exits: There are great success stories: amazing digital health companies are obtaining concrete results and scaling up. In 2016 we witnessed exciting moves in the industry; as examples: Nokia acquiring Withings for $191million and Misfit was sold to Fossil Group for $260 million. I’m expecting to see some more acquisitions and relevant exits, maybe an “unicorn” from the digital health industry. 2) New Emerging Technologies: This is the other side of the moon in tech, I saw many technologies doing a great job in 2016, however in 2017 I would like to highlight some more innovative and pretense tech that will influence healthcare with great results. Virtually Reality ( #VR ) is certainly up there, we are now seen a huge flux of #VR startups, and that’s not a coincidence….the potential is enormous. The challenge remains around business models and practical application, although great innovators are already doing great work and taking giant steps. Take a look at Dr. Shafi Ahmed , he is already using #VR live in his surgery rooms. More insights can be found at Medical Realities . 3) Connected Health: My two cents are on any digital solutions ( hardware or software ) that uses tools, wearables and sensors for collecting health data. The Wearables are now a common denominator that will assist connectivity between human being and machines. However Wearables are not novice in connected health, they have been around for a few years now.  My prediction is that connected cars will present the biggest opportunity for healthcare through Automotive Health. A crazy prediction…? Read more how connected cars will change lives . Let’s consider one of the most mature use cases: auto insurance telematics in UK, which represents one of the best practices globally. There are now almost 455,000 drivers in the UK with a telematics ‘black box’ fitted in their car, this can be used as a capability to be applied in health, however many new intelligent cars offer other ways to connect. 4) Wearables , Sensors or just clothing : wearables  started to be used in clinical trials in 2016 and this is a major breakthrough for healthcare. Read a case study here regarding correlation and context . In 2016 I noticed truly advances in wearable tech innovations, more intelligent, smaller, with more functionalities in one single device and much more. But Sensors are the “ Wearables of the Future “ or are they ? Check this innovative company – Profusa is developing a new generation of biointegrated sensors that empower an individual to continuously monitor their unique body chemistry – check how here . 5) Genomics: In the last 12 months personalized medicine or precision medicine are certainly not stranger terms for those working in healthcare innovation. Genomics offers exactly that, the opportunity to personalize health. Human Genomics are a growing industry with more innovators offering solutions to healthcare. A Spanish start up caught my eye in 2016, they are made of genes , offering a combination of technology, genomics and ( AI ) artificial intelligence. More Genomics innovations are expected in 2017.   To round round up the article in a controversial way, I would like to ask you to imagine what if….Wearables, Sensors and any other any similar wearable tech will become absolute in the near future. Is clothing the biggest and better opportunity to innovate? Blending Human need , Fashion , Tech and Health all in one piece….time will tell us. This is an exciting time to be working in the digital health innovation industry, actually! I hope you have enjoyed reading the article as much I enjoyed writing it.
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Digital Health, Wearables

The future of wearable tech has pretty much been sealed in cement. Consumers are eager and willing to adopt the latest devices in their everyday life, despite wearable technology developers admitting that there are currently limitations and full potentials still to be unlocked.

It is undeniable that consumers are welcoming a future where wearable tech will be as commonplace as smartphones.

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Digital Health, Events, Wearables

Himss Europe has organised a gathering of stakeholders in the eHealth Industry, the WoHIT (World of Health IT) event took place at Centre de Convencions Internacional (CCIB) de Barcelona on 21st and 22nd of November 2016. This inaugural event has had something for everybody, starting with a truly engaging and rich program which included 6 main plenary Summits:

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Digital Health, Wearables
Wearables are quickly becoming all the rage, and it’s easy to see why. They’re an easy way to track health progress in a very digestible way. People intrinsically have a fear of their health and it declining, so something like a Fitbit that gives them easy-to-read information and reassurance that they can get fit by taking just a few more steps is a load off to them.

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